How Do I Winterize My Flagstaff Travel Trailer?

This is a basic chart, not specific to Flagstaff, but pretty good.

This is a basic chart, not specific to Flagstaff, but pretty good.

Flagstaff Travel Trailers are designed for maximum ease of use for their owners.  They include all sorts of features that make life a little easier, and add more every year.

 

Some of the most useful features have to do with winterizing.  Since it is getting to be time, I thought it would be a perfect opportunity to highlight how to use these features to winterize your Flagstaff Travel Trailer.

Step One: Drain The Water

Walk around the trailer, and make sure your fresh water, black water and gray water tanks are empty.  Drain your water heater if it isn’t already drained.  Look under the trailer for the Low Point Drains, which are two tubes coming out from the floor.  There will be one blue one and one red one.  Remove the caps from these low point drains, and that will drain the water from the water lines themselves. HINT: when you open the low point drains, crack open one of the faucets to release the vacuum and the lines will drain faster.

Near your water pump is your water filtration system, remove the jar and dispose of the filter.  Reinstall the filter canister.

When everything is empty, cap off all the lines and close all the faucets.  Please proceed to step two…

Step Two: Change The Flow

There are two sets of valves that you need to be aware of, the hot water bypass valves, and the winterizing valve.

The water heater bypass valves are designed to close off the water heater from the water system, and save you a lot of money in anti-freeze.  They are located behind the water heater (although sometimes they are off to the side of it a little).

There are three of them, one each on the blue and red water lines, and one for the shorter crossing hose.  Turn the two main line valves so that the valve handle runs across the hose, like it is shut off.  Then open the valve on the cross hose.  This will keep anti-freeze out of your water heater, and force the anti freeze up and around to the rest of the water system.

Next to the water filter, you should find the water pump.  There is another valve on one of the hoses that lead from the wall to the pump.  This will divert the suction of the water pump from the fresh water tank to the valve on the outside of the trailer.

Now you are in the right position to finish the job….

Step 3: The Pink Stuff…

You will need about 2 gallons of RV anti-freeze, but having a third as a spare is never a bad idea.  You will also need a 4 or 5 foot length of hose with a male hose connection on it.

Ok, on the outside of your trailer, locate the Anti-freeze siphon valve, it usually is clearly marked.  It looks like a city water connector.  When you find it, hook up the hose to it, and put the other end in a gallon of anti-freeze.  Now go into the trailer and turn on your water pump, it will suck out of the antifreeze gallon directly and build pressure in the water system.

Start at the farthest away faucet from the pump, and open the hot and cold one at a time, and run them until pink is coming out of each.

Do this to each faucet as you work closer to the pump area, don’t forget to flush the toilet until you see pink as well.  Another thing that a lot of people forget is the outside shower.

Once the anti-freeze through everything, go back to the water filter and drain the access anti-freeze out of it and reinstall.

If you have any anti-freeze left over from your second gallon, pour it down the drains to fill the p-traps, and you are done till spring.

 

Of course, another option is to just call us, and we’ll do it for you…

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